I feel as if the author and I are on the same wavelength mentally, that we have a lot in common with each other, and that we could have an interesting conversation, or even a friendship,

I think we should take into account that creation and author can be two separate things

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How can we measure and prefer the content with more intrinsic value?

I think that there has been an increasing tendency in people to look for information on the web that validates their own opinions. The increasing bipolarization and radicalization seem to indicate this fact. However, I have no scientific data to allow me to validate this trend.

chrisaldrich annotation on

You cannot measure the health of journalism simply by looking at the number of editors and reporters on the payroll of newspapers. There are undoubtedly going to be fewer of them. The question is whether that loss is going to be offset by the tremendous increase in textual productivity we get from a connected web. Presuming, of course, that we don’t replace that web with glass boxes.

in https://stevenberlinjohnson.com/the-glass-box-and-the-commonplace-book-639b16c4f3bb

 

The value of journalism must take account of the increase in textual productivity gained by the interconnected Internet and not solely by the number of editors, reporters, and size or number of newspapers.

Of course we also need to account for the signal to noise ratio created by the masses of people who can say anything they like, which can also be compounded by the algorithmic feed of social platforms that give preference to the extremes and content that increases engagement (a measure which doesn’t take into account the intrinsic value of the things which are shared.)

How can we measure and prefer the content with more intrinsic value? Similar to the idea of fast food and healthier food? How can we help people to know the difference between the types of information they’re consuming.

in https://hyp.is/b0aQbG8KEeuyDR95VpabGQ/stevenberlinjohnson.com/the-glass-box-and-the-commonplace-book-639b16c4f3bb

Since the heyday of the commonplace book, there have been a few isolated attempts to turn these textual remixes into a finished product, into a standalone work of collage. The most famous is probably Jefferson’s bible, his controversial “remix” of the New Testament. There’s also Walter Benjamin’s unfinished, and ultimately unpublishable Passagenwerk, or “Arcades Project,” his rumination on the early shopping malls of Paris built out of photos, quotes, and aphoristic musings. Just this year, David Shields published a book, Reality Hunger, built out of quotes from a wide variety of sources. And of course, there are parallel works in music, painting, and architecture that are constructed out of “quotes” lifted from original sources and remixed in imaginative ways.

In https://stevenberlinjohnson.com/the-glass-box-and-the-commonplace-book-639b16c4f3bb

I would add the name of the Spanish contemporary writer, Enrique Vila-Matas, who has the habit of appropriating quotations from other writers and changing them in his works.

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